Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Engine Alignment
#1
2005 Tiara 2900 with 6L crusaders with 550 hours. Survey said that the gap was .006 inches and should be .003 inches. Mechanic said that it would take up to six hours per engine to do an alignment. Any thoughts on this?

Thanks
Like Post Reply

#2
I would question that time for an "in water" alignment. Are the mounting bolts frozen? Are the struts bent? Can you access the mounting bolts and coupling? Are you talking about Vee Drives?
A vertical alignment normally takes only minutes while a side to side adjustment is more difficult but is still  way less than 6 hours. Time to get a second opinion. Capt. George
Like Post Reply
#3
Thanks. The engines are not v drives and all of the mounting bolts are clean with no corrosion. Given that the shafts are quite short I am wondering just how critical engine alignment is. The feeler said the gap was .006 inch whereas the generic manual says the gap should be no greater than .003 inch. I also have had the cults bearings replaced.
Like Post Reply
#4
I would recommend you have the shafts aligned to factory spec of no more than .003. At .006 I would expect a vibration (although it should be minor) or at least you can expect more wear and shorter cutlass bearing life. Had shafts aligned on my 38 Open w/450 hp  Cummins when they showed .004 and .005 on the coupling. Results were good and I feel the boat is now quieter (maybe wishful thinking). M2C
Like Post Reply
#5
I get vibration starting around 2000 rpm. Standing above the struts. Engines were replace 4 years ago and now have 300 hours, [454s].
Surveyor suggested alignment. Cost to do it about $1000.00.
My mechanic suggested having shafts taken out to be checked along with the props. About 2100 hours on gear behind transmission.
I'm hauling boat out to have all sea cocks replaced, they are frozen open. I count 8 of them.
Any thoughts on the vibrations.
Previous owner never felt the vibration from the helm.
Like Post Reply
#6
Previous owners often don't notice things they have slowly grown accustom to. I have been on a few boats that had excessive vibration and the owners have no clue.
Like Post Reply
#7
your correct, previous owner is never standing above the struts while on the way.
Taking props in to be tuned up at haul out.
Checking for wobble at packing gland before haul out.
Like Post Reply
#8
(04-11-2019, 12:54 PM)remodel4@comcast.net Wrote: I get vibration starting around 2000 rpm. Standing above the struts. Engines were replace 4 years ago and now have 300 hours, [454s].
Surveyor suggested alignment. Cost to do it about $1000.00.
My mechanic suggested having shafts taken out to be checked along with the props. About 2100 hours on gear behind transmission.
I'm hauling boat out to have all sea cocks replaced, they are frozen open. I count 8 of them.
Any thoughts on the vibrations.
Previous owner never felt the vibration from the helm.


Vibration can come from unbalanced props, bent shafts, worn out cutlass bearing(s), misalignment and/or from an engine that isn’t firing equally on all holes.

Replacing engines necessarily entails realignment. And that realignment should be double checked about 50 hours afterwards. A step often dispensed with by my (less scrupulous) colleagues. Not a good thing as repowering usually means, at least, 2 weeks on the hard. Boats that have been out of the water get “bent”. A few weeks in the water “straightens” them. At which point an adjustment of the alignment may be required.

You’re hauling out for the seacocks (a wise decision). I’m going to assume you’re going to redo the bottom paint too. I would also send the props for balancing. When they’re off the condition of the cutlass bearings can be inspected. The shafts can also be inspected for straightness. If you’re pulling the shafts consider putting in dripless shaft seals.

Before you pull her get your mechanic to ascertain that all holes are firing roughly equally. On a gas engine you can do that by pulling the plug wires one by one and noting the RPM drop. An electronic tachometer comes in handy. On a straight diesel you can achieve the same result by cracking the fuel line at the injector. A few drops of fuel will leak. On an electronically controlled diesel you’ll pull the injector wires one by one.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Like Post Reply
#9
update.
Starboard shaft needed straightened, prop tuned, new cutlass and alignment.
Port, needed the prop tuned. no need for alignment.
All sea cocks. Good working condition.
February
New Raritan toilet
New water supply line to toilet
New vent line for holding tank
Replace all 1 1/2 from toilet
Thank god for the heat gun.
Like Post Reply
  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  [Tiara Coronet] Engine temp Capt. Paul 4 295 10-31-2019, 03:01 PM
Last Post: Matta0413
  8.1L Crusader Check Engine Light and Alarm rcwiegand 3 588 07-13-2019, 01:35 PM
Last Post: rcwiegand
  Engine service Dgespo 1 859 07-06-2018, 05:49 AM
Last Post: reeltimebrad1
  Engine will not start Coppifan 5 1,437 01-21-2018, 12:39 PM
Last Post: efontana
  Hard start on one engine rexmobile 9 1,984 07-28-2017, 03:19 PM
Last Post: rexmobile



Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

Engine Alignment00