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genny issues any help appreciated
#1
I have a Kohler model 7.3e( 2006)   for some reason, it starts and runs good for maybe all day, but then the next day will only run for 5 hrs and then the next day maybe 2 hrs.
This past week, it ran good for 2 hrs, but we shut it down, and a few hrs later fired it back up no problem, but after an hr it shut itself down again.
We have trouble shot the usual suspects, impeller good, pumps water good, we back flushed the cooling system and didnt really get anything out, the tech checked most everything he could think up.  The housing on the water pump side stays cool.

So any ideas on what caused the shut down?  
Could it be wired to the CO detectors and they shut it down?  (but they are not going off yet they work)

Could be an 'elbow' in the cooling system that Kohler supposedly  recalled? 

any ideas are appreciated!
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#2
this could drive you nuts... i would call a marine tech. don't think its wired to CO
Capt. Brett M. Sause
USCG Master Licensed Captain 
443.220.4339


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#3
Not a Kohler expert but you typically need to determine of it is a mechanical issue (engine overheating, fuel starvation, etc) or a control issue (bad relay, control board, etc). For starters would wait for a shutdown then check the state of the sensors (coolant temp, oil p, exhaust temp, etc) to see if one of those are tripping a shutdown sequence. otherwise as Capt Brett indicated you can get real deep trying to troubleshoot control issues and or intermittent problems like an electric fuel pump going bad. A service manual and DVM are pretty important for troubleshooting. If you turn to a professional make sure you find someone who has experience with generator controls.
[-] The following 1 user Likes jclark003's post:
sluggo (06-20-2018)
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#4
Have you looked at the fuel filters? Mine was doing the same thing and the intervals were getting shorter and shorter. I changed the racor and primary filter and all is well again.
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#5
(06-21-2018, 09:17 PM)Sans Peur Wrote: Have you looked at the fuel filters?  Mine was doing the same thing and the intervals were getting shorter and shorter.  I changed the racor and primary filter and all is well again.
Thanks will double check that, but I have changed the main as well as the one for the genny, but it is a good idea.  Thanks!
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#6
(06-19-2018, 09:15 PM)jclark003 Wrote: Not a Kohler expert but you typically need to determine of it is a mechanical issue (engine overheating, fuel starvation, etc) or a control issue (bad relay, control board, etc). For starters would wait for a shutdown then check the state of the sensors (coolant temp, oil p, exhaust temp, etc) to see if one of those are tripping a shutdown sequence. otherwise as Capt Brett indicated you can get real deep trying to troubleshoot control issues and or intermittent problems like an electric fuel pump going bad. A service manual and DVM are pretty important for troubleshooting. If you turn to a professional make sure you find someone who has experience with generator controls.

Thanks! I have changed out most of the sensors, this electric fuel pump seems to come up quite often as a possible problem, maybe I'll just swap it out just to see what happens.  I figure it cant hurt, and besides its a 2006 so its 12 yrs old.
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#7
(06-22-2018, 09:31 AM)sluggo Wrote:
(06-19-2018, 09:15 PM)jclark003 Wrote: Not a Kohler expert but you typically need to determine of it is a mechanical issue (engine overheating, fuel starvation, etc) or a control issue (bad relay, control board, etc). For starters would wait for a shutdown then check the state of the sensors (coolant temp, oil p, exhaust temp, etc) to see if one of those are tripping a shutdown sequence. otherwise as Capt Brett indicated you can get real deep trying to troubleshoot control issues and or intermittent problems like an electric fuel pump going bad. A service manual and DVM are pretty important for troubleshooting. If you turn to a professional make sure you find someone who has experience with generator controls.

Thanks! I have changed out most of the sensors, this electric fuel pump seems to come up quite often as a possible problem, maybe I'll just swap it out just to see what happens.  I figure it cant hurt, and besides its a 2006 so its 12 yrs old.

FYI  I always like to double back, and if I found a solution, to let the next guy know.  We think we have it fixed, he changed all the stuff we could mechanically, fuel pumps, sensors, fuel filters etc etc.  Finally we switched out the electronic board, and I think we have it fixed!! knock on wood!!  It ran for 4 hrs yesterday, with out missing a beat, and put out good, stable power!  I think the board was around $140.
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#8
(11-28-2018, 04:13 PM)sluggo Wrote:
(06-22-2018, 09:31 AM)sluggo Wrote:
(06-19-2018, 09:15 PM)jclark003 Wrote: Not a Kohler expert but you typically need to determine of it is a mechanical issue (engine overheating, fuel starvation, etc) or a control issue (bad relay, control board, etc). For starters would wait for a shutdown then check the state of the sensors (coolant temp, oil p, exhaust temp, etc) to see if one of those are tripping a shutdown sequence. otherwise as Capt Brett indicated you can get real deep trying to troubleshoot control issues and or intermittent problems like an electric fuel pump going bad. A service manual and DVM are pretty important for troubleshooting. If you turn to a professional make sure you find someone who has experience with generator controls.

Thanks! I have changed out most of the sensors, this electric fuel pump seems to come up quite often as a possible problem, maybe I'll just swap it out just to see what happens.  I figure it cant hurt, and besides its a 2006 so its 12 yrs old.

FYI  I always like to double back, and if I found a solution, to let the next guy know.  We think we have it fixed, he changed all the stuff we could mechanically, fuel pumps, sensors, fuel filters etc etc.  Finally we switched out the electronic board, and I think we have it fixed!! knock on wood!!  It ran for 4 hrs yesterday, with out missing a beat, and put out good, stable power!  I think the board was around $140.
Well to triple back on this, it looks like its not fixed.  So frustrating, I don't know what to do next.  As I mentioned, when I took it to its winter home, it ran fine.  When I brought it back to its summer home, it ran fine.  But in review, what kind of load was on it?  I didn't run the A/C I know going down , and I cant remember on the way back, plus it was relatively cool outside.  Does the outside temperature have some effect on all of this? IDK.
Now that it has gotten hot outside (90+) and the river water temp has risen into the mid 70's, it is only running an hour and shuts down.  I suspect a heat issue, but I cant find where.  We blead the lines and did get some air out of them, but it still only ran 1 hr.
The bigger problem is, I don't have a certified marine A/C tech anywhere near by!!  I am not sure what to do next. 
Any thoughts??
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#9
If it seems heat related and warmer raw water=shorter time before fault, assuming it is so equipped I would start by looking at the exhaust temp switch. put a meter on it when cool to figure out if the switch is normally open or normally closed. The run the generator until it shuts down and see if the switch tripped. You can do the same for coolant temperature, etc. I would put a heavy load on the unit and see if that accelerates the shutdown sequence. The higher the load the higher the exhaust gas temperature. High egt can come from a restriction in the shower head, (diverting the spray away from the sensor), restriction in heat exchanger or oil cooler, etc. It's also not unusual for exhaust temp sensors to go bad.
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#10
(07-05-2019, 10:26 PM)jclark003 Wrote: If it seems heat related and warmer raw water=shorter time before fault, assuming it is so equipped I would start by looking at the exhaust temp switch. put a meter on it when cool to figure out if the switch is normally open or normally closed. The run the generator until it shuts down and see if the switch tripped. You can do the same for coolant temperature, etc.  I would put a heavy load on the unit and see if that accelerates the shutdown sequence. The higher the load the higher the exhaust gas temperature. High egt can come from a restriction in the shower head, (diverting the spray away from the sensor), restriction in heat exchanger or oil cooler, etc.  It's also not unusual for exhaust temp sensors to go bad.

thank you for the response I will look at those again.  We have changed the exhaust temp. switch at least once, but I guess it wouldn't hurt to trouble shoot that again following what you said.  I will let you know.  Relative to the load, it does not seem to matter, I ran it Sunday with almost no load, ie A/C and the result was the same.  I'll keep trying and keep asking!! and thanks again for the response!!
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genny issues any help appreciated00